Low serum albumin levels predict poor outcome in patients with acute ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack

Background

To examine the relationship of serum albumin with poor functional outcome and mortality in patients with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), and perform a meta-analysis to summarise the association.

Methods

We analysed data from the Third China National Stroke Registry (CNSR-). Patients were divided into four groups based on serum albumin levels at admission. The outcomes included poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 3 to 6) and mortality at 3 months and 1 year. Multiple logistic regression models and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the association, respectively. We used a fixed-effect model to calculate the risk ratio for poor functional outcome and a random-effect model for mortality in the meta-analysis.

Results

A total of 13 618 patients were enrolled. During the 3-month follow-up period, compared with 40 to 44.9 g/L group, patients in <35 g/L group had an increased risk of poor functional outcome and mortality (adjusted OR 1.37 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.67); adjusted HR 2.13 (95% CI 1.41 to 3.23)). The relationship in per 10 g/L decreased serum albumin with prognosis was consistently inversed (adjusted OR 1.17 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.35); adjusted HR 1.86 (95% CI 1.30 to 2.64)). Also, low serum albumin levels were independently correlated with clinical outcomes at 1 year. In the meta-analysis, the OR for poor functional outcome pooled 3 studies per 1 g/L decrease was 1.03 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.05), and the HR for mortality pooled 5 studies was 1.07 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.11).

Conclusions

Low serum albumin levels predict poor functional outcome and mortality in patients with AIS or TIA.

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