African Americans Have Differences in CSF Soluble TREM2 and Associated Genetic Variants

Objective

To evaluate for racial differences in triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), a key immune mediator in Alzheimer disease, the levels of CSF soluble TREM2 (sTREM2), and the frequency of associated genetic variants were compared in groups of individuals who self-reported their race as African American (AA) or non-Hispanic White (NHW).

Methods

Community-dwelling older research participants underwent measurement of CSF sTREM2 concentrations and genetic analyses.

Results

The primary cohort included 91 AAs and 868 NHWs. CSF sTREM2 levels were lower in the AA compared with the NHW group (1,336 ± 470 vs 1,856 ± 624 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). AAs were more likely to carry TREM2 coding variants (15% vs 3%, p < 0.0001), which were associated with lower CSF sTREM2. AAs were less likely to carry the rs1582763 minor allele (8% vs 37%, p < 0.0001), located near MS4A4A, which was associated with higher CSF sTREM2. These findings were replicated in an independent cohort of 23 AAs and 917 NHWs: CSF sTREM2 levels were lower in the AA group (p = 0.03), AAs were more likely to carry coding TREM2 variants (22% vs 4%, p = 0.002), and AAs were less likely to carry the rs1582763 minor allele (16% vs 37%, p = 0.003).

Conclusions

On average, AAs had lower CSF sTREM2 levels compared with NHWs, potentially because AAs are more likely to carry genetic variants associated with lower CSF sTREM2 levels. Importantly, CSF sTREM2 reflects TREM2-mediated microglial activity, a critical step in the immune response to amyloid plaques. These findings suggest that race may be associated with risk for genetic variants that influence Alzheimer disease–related inflammation.

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