Epilepsy

Linjun Tang, Linbo Ge, Weijun Wu, Xuguang Yang, Pinhe Rui, Yong Wu, Wan Yu, Xi Wang October 8, 2017

Epilepsy influences 65 million people worldwide and entails a major burden in seizure-related disability, stigma, mortality, and costs [1,2]. Around 30–40% of patients have seizures that are generalized at onset. In general, generalized epilepsies (GE) are determined and affect otherwise normal people of both sexes and races [3].… Read More...

Li-na Zhu, Deng Chen, Da Xu, Ge Tan, Hai-Jiao Wang, Ling Liu October 8, 2017

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases. Up to 30% of patients ultimately develop refractory epilepsy despite appropriate medical therapy [1]. In recent years, a number of newer AEDs with more desirable safety profiles have been introduced on the market to offer better seizure control for patients with epilepsy, especially for those with refractory epilepsy.… Read More...

Paula Jansen, Martina P. Neininger, Matthias K. Bernhard, Wieland Kiess, Andreas Merkenschlager, Thilo Bertsche, Astrid Bertsche October 8, 2017

Over the last few decades, many studies investigating affected and unaffected persons have dealt with knowledge of and attitudes toward epilepsy. Many of them examined the view of adults [1–9], whereas only a few studies focused on the view of children and adolescents [10–14].… Read More...

Carlo Di Bonaventura, Mariarita Albini, Alessandro D’Elia, Jinane Fattouch, Martina Fanella, Alessandra Morano, Giulia Lucignani, Mario Manfredi, Claudio Colonnese, Maurizio Salvati, Nicola Vanacore, Alfredo Berardelli, Anna Teresa Giallonardo October 8, 2017

The clinical manifestations of high-grade gliomas (HGG) vary according to the extension of the tumor, its location and its possible clinical complications, which include intracranial hypertension and hemorrhage. Seizures are the first clinical sign in 30–50% of patients, whereas they occur later in the course of the disease in 10–30% of patients [1–3].… Read More...

Mathilde Chipaux, Georg Dorfmüller, Martine Fohlen, Nathalie Dorison, Marie-Astrid Metten, Olivier Delalande, Sarah Ferrand-Sorbets, Delphine Taussig October 8, 2017

Infantile spasms (IS) are defined as brief axial contraction, lasting less than two seconds, recurring in short clusters [1]; they can be considered as focal or generalized seizures [2]. The onset is often in infancy but sometimes later in life. They are often associated with severe encephalopathy and hypsarrythmia (West syndrome) but do not necessarily indicate generalized epilepsy since they can occur as the only seizure type in surgically curable focal and hemispheric epilepsies [3,4,5] or be associated with other types of partial seizures [6,7].… Read More...

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