Movement Disorders

Till A. Dembek, Paul Reker, Veerle Visser-Vandewalle, Jochen Wirths, Harald Treuer, Martin Klehr, Jan Roediger, Haidar S. Dafsari, Michael T. Barbe, Lars Timmermann September 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

Objective

The objective of this study was to investigate whether directional deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson’s disease (PD) offers increased therapeutic windows, side-effect thresholds, and clinical benefit.

Methods

In 10 patients, 20 monopolar reviews were conducted in a prospective, randomized, double-blind design to identify the best stimulation directions and compare them to conventional circular DBS regarding side-effect thresholds, motor improvement, and therapeutic window.

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H. A. Jinnah, Alberto Albanese, Kailash P. Bhatia, Francisco Cardoso, Gustavo Da Prat, Tom J. de Koning, Alberto J. Espay, Victor Fung, Pedro J. Garcia-Ruiz, Oscar Gershanik, Joseph Jankovic, Ryuji Kaji, Katya Kotschet, Connie Marras, Janis M. Miyasaki, Francesca Morgante, Alexander Munchau, Pramod Kumar Pal, Maria C. Rodriguez Oroz, Mayela Rodríguez-Violante, Ludger Schöls, Maria Stamelou, Marina Tijssen, Claudia Uribe Roca, Andres de la Cerda, Emilia M. Gatto, September 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

There are many rare movement disorders, and new ones are described every year. Because they are not well recognized, they often go undiagnosed for long periods of time. However, early diagnosis is becoming increasingly important. Rapid advances in our understanding of the biological mechanisms responsible for many rare disorders have enabled the development of specific treatments for some of them.

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Brage Brakedal, Irene Flønes, Simone F. Reiter, Øivind Torkildsen, Christian Dölle, Jörg Assmus, Kristoffer Haugarvoll, Charalampos Tzoulis September 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

Background

Whether antidiabetic glitazone drugs protect against Parkinson’s disease remains controversial. Although a single clinical trial showed no evidence of disease modulation, retrospective studies suggest that a disease-preventing effect may be plausible. The objective of this study was to examine if the use of glitazone drugs is associated with a lower incidence of PD among diabetic patients.

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Paolo Eusebi, David Giannandrea, Leonardo Biscetti, Iosief Abraha, Davide Chiasserini, Massimiliano Orso, Paolo Calabresi, Lucilla Parnetti September 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

Background

The accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein aggregates is associated with PD. However, the diagnostic value of the α-synuclein levels in CSF is still under investigation.

Methods

A comprehensive search of the literature was performed, yielding 34 studies eligible for meta-analysis.

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Haruo Nishijima, Tatsuya Ueno, Yukihisa Funamizu, Shinya Ueno, Masahiko Tomiyama September 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Levodopa is the most effective treatment for the motor symptoms of PD. However, chronic oral levodopa treatment can lead to various motor and nonmotor complications because of nonphysiological pulsatile dopaminergic stimulation in the brain.

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Wei Han, Shraddha Sapkota, Richard Camicioli, Roger A. Dixon, Liang Li September 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

Objective

To profile the amine/phenol submetabolome to determine potential metabolite biomarkers associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and PD with incipient dementia.

Methods

At baseline of a 3-wave (18-month intervals) longitudinal study, serum samples were collected from 42 healthy controls and 43 PD patients.

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Fei Yang, Alicja Wolk, Niclas Håkansson, Nancy L. Pedersen, Karin Wirdefeldt September 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

Background: A neuroprotective effect of dietary antioxidants on Parkinson’s disease (PD) risk has been suggested, but epidemiological evidence is limited.

Objectives: To examine the associations between intake of dietary antioxidant vitamins and total antioxidant capacity and risk of PD.

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