admin May 10, 2019

Emerging evidence suggests that Parkinson’s disease (PD) results from disrupted oscillatory activity in cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical (CBGTC) and cerebellar networks which can be partially corrected by applying deep brain stimulation (DBS). The inherent dynamic nature of such oscillatory activity might implicate that is represents temporal aspects of motor control. While the timing of muscle activities in CBGTC networks constitute the temporal dimensions of distinct motor acts, these very networks are also involved in somatosensory processing. In this respect, a temporal aspect of somatosensory processing in motor control concerns matching predicted (feedforward) and actual (feedback) sensory consequences of movement which implies a distinct contribution to demarcating the temporal order of events. Emerging evidence shows that such somatosensory processing is altered in movement disorders. This raises the question how disrupted oscillatory activity is related to impaired temporal processing and how / whether DBS can functionally restore this. In this perspective article, the neural underpinnings of temporal processing will be reviewed and translated to the specific alternated oscillatory neural activity specifically found in Parkinson’s disease. These findings will be integrated in a neurophysiological framework linking somatosensory and motor processing. Finally, future implications for neuromodulation will be discussed with potential implications for strategy across a range of movement disorders.

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