Shyamal C. Bir September 5, 2017

Journal of Neurosurgery, Ahead of Print. OBJECTIVE Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with the progression of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms. However, the role of OSA in the overall outcome of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) has not yet been established. Authors of this report investigated the role of OSA in the overall outcome of IAs. METHODS Radiological and clinical data on patients (from 2010 through 2015) with confirmed IA were retrospectively reviewed. Significant differences between the OSA and non-OSA groups were determined using a chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of an unfavorable IA outcome. RESULTS Among the 283 patients with confirmed IAs, 45 patients (16%) were positively screened for OSA, a proportion that was significantly higher than the prevalence of OSA in nonaneurysmal neurosurgical patients (4%, p = 0.008). The percentage of patients with hypertension (p = 0.018), a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 (p < 0.0001), hyperlipidemia (p = 0.034), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.005), chronic heart disease (CHD; p = 0.024), or prior stroke (p = 0.03) was significantly higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group. Similarly, the percentage of wide-necked aneurysms (p = 0.00001) and patients with a poor Hunt and Hess Grade IV–V (p = 0.01) was significantly higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group. In addition, the percentage of ruptured aneurysms (p = 0.03) and vasospasms (p = 0.03) was significantly higher in the OSA group. The percentage of patients with poor

http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2016.10.JNS162316?mi=67t04w&af=R

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